“Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways.”
We praise people for being “naturally” smart, too, “naturally” athletic, and etc. But studies continue to show, as they have for some time now, that it is generally healthier to praise schoolchildren for being hardworking, than for being naturally gifted. We know now that to emphasize a child’s inherent ability places pressure on that child to continue to be accidentally talented, which is something that is hard for anyone to control. When the children who are applauded for their natural skills fail, they are shown to take the failure very personally. After all, the process of their success has always seemed mysterious and basic and inseparable from the rest of their identity, so it must be they who are failing as whole people. When students are instead complimented and rewarded for their effort and improvement, they tend to not be so hard on themselves. When they fail, they reason, “Well, I’ll work harder next time.” They learn that they are capable of success, rather than constantly automatically deserving of it, and they learn simultaneously that they are bigger and more complex than their individual successes or failures.
— Kate of Eat the Damn Cake, The Stupidity of “Natural” Beauty  (via vogueltalia)
likeafieldmouse:

Heinrich-Siegfried Bormann - Visual Analysis of a Piece of Music from a Color-theory Class with Wassily Kandinsky (1930)

likeafieldmouse:

Heinrich-Siegfried Bormann - Visual Analysis of a Piece of Music from a Color-theory Class with Wassily Kandinsky (1930)

If I told you that a flower bloomed in a dark room, would you trust it?

Kendrick Lamar

This line encapsulates the concept of a good kid in a bad city, and it cuts into one of the most moral questions in human existence: Can good come from evil? The best part about the line, as is true of the best poetry, is that it doesn’t answer the question it asks. For Kendrick’s immediate purposes, he’s the flower and the city is the dark room. The question is: Can you trust him?

(via neuksei)

cactus-breath:


Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

The blade reads: “Che la mia ferita sia mortale" - or roughly: "may all your wounds be mortal".

cactus-breath:

Corsican vendetta knife with floral detail

The blade reads: Che la mia ferita sia mortale" - or roughly: "may all your wounds be mortal".

And together we shall dig graves for all that die in us,
and we shall stand in the sun with a will
and we shall be dangerous.
The Madman, Khalil Gibran (via kassapti)